PCOS And Pregnancy: Conceiving And Keeping The Pregnancy

PCOS And Pregnancy

PCOS and pregnancy may seem to be mutually exclusive.

But it is possible to become pregnant with PCOS( polycystic ovarian syndrome) and have a normal pregnancy.

While some women may conceive spontaneously, others will do so with the
help of appropriate medical treatment.Still,other women will find it
difficult to conceive even with appropriate medical therapies
necessitating trial of surgical options.

In this webpage, I will
look at the link between pregnancy and PCOS and what do do to become
pregnant with PCOS or take a pregnancy successfully to term.

PCOS and Pregnancy

Getting pregnant with PCOS is possible though not as easily as
other women without it. PCOS has two groups of effects on pregnancy
issues

  1. Difficulty achieving a pregnancy due to infertility
  2. Pregnancy complications after you become pregnant.

The pregnancy complications that have been linked with PCOS include

  • Miscarriage
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia)
  • Premature delivery

Counseling
a woman with PCOS who has had a miscarriage is a very emotional
process. The pregnancy is often achieved after repeated trials and
sometimes tremendous efforts sometimes.When it ends with a miscarriage,
the grief is usually great. However, there is still hope of trying again
and taking a pregnancy to term.

PCOS may also lead to

  • Multiple
    pregnancies, twins and even triplets. This is often due to clomiphene
    used to induce ovulation in these women which may cause the release of
    more than one egg. Multiple pregnancy with PCOS is a high-risk pregnancy
    that requires close obstetric follow-up.
  • Babies
    at risks also. Babies born to women with PCOS have a higher risk of
    spending time in a neonatal intensive care unit or of dying before,
    during, or shortly after birth.

What Should I Do?

If you are wanting to become pregnant with PCOS, these are the recommended steps to take

  1. Talk to your doctor about your pregnancy priorities for optimization of
    therapy and removing any medications that may prevent pregnancy. Birth
    control pills or injections control irregular menses but will prevent
    pregnancy so plan carefully with your doctor.
  2. Take
    lifestyle measures seriously, including diet, weight loss and exercise.
    These are actually treatment in themselves for PCOS and will increase
    your chances of ovulating and becoming pregnant.
  3. If you have regular cycles, carrying out fertility charting may offer some benefits.
  4. When fertility drugs are prescribed, be sure to follow the instructions carefully on how to take them.
  5. Once you get pregnant, inform your doctor.

If you are already pregnant, congratulations! These are some things to do to ensure that you take your pregnancy to term

  1. Learn about PCOS and pregnancy and ask your provider any questions.
  2. Recognize that pregnancy with PCOS is a high risk pregnancy and
    requires close obstetric follow-up. You will sure not want to loose a
    PCOS pregnancy because of negligence!
  3. Do not fold
    your arms with your diet, weight watch and exercise! Get advise from
    your care provider how to continue with these now that you are pregnant.
  4. Be sure to inform your doctor as soon as you get pregnant for modification of your therapy and planning of antenatal care.
  5. Keep
    cool! Just relaxing and not being too anxious will help you and your
    baby in the uterus. Discuss any worries with your provider.

Return From PCOS And Pregnancy To Polycystic Ovarian Disease

Return From PCOS And Pregnancy To Menstruation Home


Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Jamie

    I was diagnosed with PCOS about 4 months ago and was placed on metformin. I found out I was pregnant a few days ago. This is my second pregnancy I have a 4 year old. Is it possible that I have always had PCOS? After my daughter I was on the Depo shot about 2 1/2 years been off it for about 1 1/2yr… this article has got me really worried about this pregnancy.

  • georgia

    I recently found out that I am pregnant. About 5-6 weeks along. Not entirely sure as I have very irregular periods due to my PCOS. I am only 21 and this pregnancy was not planned especially because doc always said my chances are very low. I didn’t think about my chances of miscarriage and complication after getting pregnant. Now I am very worried after reading this as I just got excited about my pregnancy!

  • Megan

    I just would like to share my experience with everyone. I was diagnosed with PCOS at a very young age. The dr put me on birth control to try to control the growth of the cysts at 13 years old. Birth control made me suicidal and I was very very incontrolably depressed. I got off the medication and my life retuned to normal. I had never used birth control since. I never got pregnant. Although we were not trying, I felt I would never have kids and that broke my heart. I didn’t feel like a woman. When I met my husband, I had told him that the likelihood of me getting pregnant was slim to none. After trying for years, we had given up and accepted that we were not going to have children of our own. On my husbands birthday, I was having a lot of pain and a lot of bleeding. I went in for an ultrasound to find that I was miss carrying 12 week twins. There was no heartbeat. I was so upset I decided to go home and not go to the hospital. I was devistated and scared to tell my husband. 2 months later I discovered that I was septic. I spent a lot of time in the hospital and I almost died. We had given up. I didn’t want to experience that pain ever again, and neither did my husband. Well….. Nearly a year later, we had discovered that i was pregnant again! With close monitoring, I carried my son to term. I had some complications, I went into preterm labor at 30 weeks and was hospitalized. Now, my son is 7 months old and I had an IUD. I had thought a cyst popped so I went into the drs office. Turns out, I did have a cyst pop…. But I am also 5 weeks 4 days pregnant! They were able to remove the IUD, I had some bleeding, but the baby is still in there! I’ve had some complications so far.